According to Wikipedia:

In hacker culture, a script kiddie is a derogatory term used for an inexperienced malicious hacker who uses programs developed by others to attack computer systems, and deface websites. It is generally assumed that script kiddies are juveniles who lack the ability to write sophisticated hacking programs on their own, and that their objective is to try to impress their friends or gain credit in underground hacker communities.

It continues continues: Script kiddies have at their disposal a large number of effective, easily downloadable malicious programs capable of harassing even advanced computers and networks.

Anyway, according to Wikipedia, I do not know a single person involved in the information security industry today that does not fit the description of a script kiddie. Even the best and the baddest hackers I know can easily be named script kiddies if they change their handle to something you are not familiar with. Here is why:

  • Script Kiddies are juveniles – IMHO, all hackers are juveniles (mind or body) regardless of their skills and abilities.
  • Script Kiddies use tools they don’t write – Like you write everything you use? Life is short! Successful people build themselves on the top of the experience and the work of those before them. Why reinvent the wheel?
  • Script Kiddies have at their disposal large repository of downloadable tools – You mean like Backtrack? Or perhaps any standard Linux distribution?
  • Script Kiddies deface websites and scan the internet for known vulnerabilities – Hackers are opportunists. Skill sometimes is not enough. You need to be lucky too.
  • Script Kiddies cannot program – It is perceived that 1337 security researchers are those who know ASM and C and perhaps perl, python or ruby. A junior web developer knows 10 times more languages and has experience with a lot more programming environments.
  • Script Kiddies’ objective is to try to impress their friends or gain credit – Everybody wants some type of credit even when they claim that they don’t. In our human nature there are a driving forces bigger then wealth and these are credit, approval and acceptance among your family and peers.